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Vernon-Jackson
Long Island City
USA

Mike makes stuff. Mostly involving words, notes, thoughts, and images. Also a podcast. Enjoy. 

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A blog featuring Mike's Images & words. Occasionally sounds. 

That Boss is Dope: A Brief Comedy Lesson from the Corporate World

Mbhumor

An excerpt from Inc Magazine interview with Robert Sutton, author of “The No Asshole Rule”, which I think applies to Stand-up perfectly.

Bosses

From your book, it sounds as though being a good boss involves a lot of acting: acting confident, acting like you are in control. That sounds exhausting. And doesn’t it compromise authenticity?

At the time you make a decision, no one knows whether it is right or wrong. But research shows that if you, as the authority figure, act confident about implementing the decision, it increases the odds of success. If you lack confidence, people will be less committed to your decision. They have less faith in you as a leader. So you have to convince them you are in control. Then, if it turns out you are wrong, you say, “I was wrong” and explain what you’re going to do differently. And say that you are really confident that this new approach is right. You start the confidence cycle again. There are many ways in which people show they are authentically confident. Some people are quiet, calm leaders, and some are more inspirational. But for most leaders, there are times you need to fake it. What is the alternative? Do employees want to follow a leader who constantly conveys his doubts that something is going to work out? Still, I do generally believe in authenticity. It is a dilemma.

Read the full interview by Leigh Buchanan at:http://www.inc.com/magazine/20101001/lessons-from-nightmare-bosses.html